Tag Archives: Reflection

The first time she has seen a 20$ bill

So I take out my pink-white striped wallet and pay for her hot chocolate, my matcha latte with almond milk and two deeelicious macarons, using a 20$ bill, green and friendly as the country it belongs to (god praise Canada).

Here is what she says.

“Can I see it? That’s the first time I see one.”

“You mean, that’s the first time ever you see a 20$ bill?”

“I’ve seen nana using 5$ and 10$ bills before, but never a 20$ one.”

After that we changed the coins her nana gave her and the 5$ she got from her grandpa to her first own 10$ bill! You should have seen that smile…

I recently started volunteering with an organization in Vancouver where we as volunteers – I love how they call it – coach vulnerable kids for the game of life.

Every week, me and her spend some quality time together. We go iceskating, to the aquarium, or like on that day, play a board game or cards in a cozy cafe.

In moments like this, I realize – how much of a difference I can make just by taking out this adorable girl to places she hasn’t been before and showing her the world.

These few hours we spend together might mean a small thing for us in our busy-minded life, but they mean the world to kids like her…

Originally I started volunteering because I was seeking for compensation to my 9-to-5 office job and – of course – giving something back to the society.

Definetly a win-win for both of us, I thought. I love all the activities we get to do together.

But it’s way more than that. I didn’t expect how much I could learn from a 8-year old girl.

Not only that this smarty-pants corrects my english grammar mistakes, she makes me climb on trees, draw pictures of Helen, the dolphin in the aquarium, spend 2 hours watching and feeding fishes and play hide and seek in a fancy shopping mall.

Kids like her teach us what some of us might have forgotten in our fast-paced world – to stop to think, enjoy the moment and smile.

With this being said I just want to remind us all that there are so many opportunities to give something back to our society just by spending some quality time with another person – no matter the age or background.

Let’s not forget about the power of time and attention, we can make a big difference in somebodys life.

And in the end, we realize how much we earn in return.

Pina


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It’s your decision

Wolf

An old Cherokee is teaching his grandson about life:

“A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy.
”It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil–he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.”

He continued, “The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you–and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather: “Which wolf will win?”

The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”

It’s what you’re part of

Unbenannt3

“And me? I still believe in paradise. 

But now at least I know it’s not some place you can look for. Because it’s not where you go.

It’s how you feel for a moment in your life when you’re a part of something. And if you find that moment…

It lasts forever.”

–  Richard played by Leonardo Dicaprio in The Beach

About traveling and loneliness – a trigger to reflect what we’re doing

istock-travel-backpacker

This is an excerpt out of the book ‘Shantaram’ by David Gregory Roberts.

This dialogue is between two Indian people, Prabaker from Bombay and a bus driver, on the way to a village in India. They are talking about Prabakers friend from New Zealand, who is accompanying him and living in Bombay for a while. It’s written in the first-perspective of the New Zealander

“‘Gora kaun hain?’ the [bus] driver asked, when we climbed aboard the step. Who’s the white guy?

Maza mitra ahey,’ Prabaker answered with contrived nonchalance, trying in vain to disguise his pride. He’s my friend.

The exchange was in Marathi, the language of Maharashtra State, which has Bombay as its capital. I didn’t understand much of it then, but the same questions and answers were repeated so often during those village months that I learned most of the phrases, with some variations, by heart.

‘What’s he doing here?’

‘He’s visiting my family.’

‘Where’s he from?’

‘New Zealand,’ Prabaker replied.

‘New Zealand?’

‘Yes. New Zealand. In Europe.’

‘Plenty of money in New Zealand?’

‘Yes, yes. Plenty. They’re all rich, white people there.’

‘Does he speak Marathi?’

‘No.’

‘Hindi?’

‘No. Only English.’

‘Only English?’

‘Yes.’

‘Why?’

‘They don’t speak Hindi in his country.’

‘They don’t speak Hindi there?’

‘No.’

‘No Marathi? No Hindi?’

‘No. Only English.’

‘Holy Father! The poor fool.’

‘Yes.’

‘How old is he?’

‘Thirty.’

‘He looks older.’

‘They all do. All the Europeans look older and angrier than they really are. It’s a white thing.’

‘Is he married?’

‘No.’

‘Not married? Thirty, and not married? What’s wrong with him?’

‘He’s European. A lot of them get married only when they’re old.’

‘That’s crazy.’

‘Yes.’

‘What job does he do?’

‘He’s a teacher.’

‘A teacher is good.’

‘Yes.’

‘Does he have a mother and a father?’

‘Yes.’

‘Where are they?’

‘In his native place. New Zealand.’

‘Why isn’t he with them?’

‘He’s travelling. He’s looking at the whole world.’

‘Why?’

‘Europeans do that. They work for a while, and then they travel around, lonely, for a while, with no family, until they get old, and then they get married, and become very serious.’

‘That’s crazy.’

‘Yes.’

‘He must be lonely, without his mummy and his daddy, and with no wife and children.’

‘Yes. But the Europeans don’t mind. They get a lot of practice being lonely.’

‘He has a big strong body.’

‘Yes.’

‘A very strong body.’

‘Yes.’

‘Make sure you feed him properly, and give him plenty of milk.’

‘Yes.’

‘Buffalo milk.’

‘Yes, yes.’

‘And make sure he doesn’t learn any bad words. Don’t teach him any swearing. There are plenty of arseholes and bastards around who will teach him the wrong sisterfucking words. Keep him away from mother-fuckers like that.’

‘I will.’

‘And don’t let anyone take advantage of him. He doesn’t look too bright. Keep an eye on him.’

‘He’s brighter than he looks, but yes, I will look after him.’

It troubled none of the other passengers on the bus that the conversation of several minutes had taken place before we could board the bus and move off. The driver and Prabaker had made sure to speak at a volume adequate to the task of including everyone in the bus. “

At the end it’s all about the Point of view